Why You Should Train Your Bird BEFORE Going in Showmanship

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Blackie, a bantam Cochin, is my favorite hen to show.  She’s well-behaved and has won several championships and grand championships.


You should really train your bird to be picked up the correct way before going in showmanship.  Otherwise, you may find your bird perched on your arm, or worse, your head.  Handle the bird when it’s young to get the best showmanship bird.  And make sure you know the correct way to pick up a bird.  We handle our birds at home by not picking them up the way you are supposed to because they’re not used to it.  But the birds we’re planning to take in showmanship get picked up the right way in preparation for the show.

Owly with Her Friend Snowball


Bantams are ideal for showmanship.


Also, not all birds are fun to take in showmanship.  Out of our 23 birds, there are only 3 good showmanship chickens.  Bantams are ideal because they’re smaller and you don’t have to work hard to pick them up.  Also, it’s harder when a 7-pound Jersey Giant misbehaves.  The absolute worst showmanship bird is one you can’t pick up without it perching on your arm.  Everyone will be staring at you in the showmanship class as it claws you and you try to shake it off.

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Not all birds are good for showmanship.


Handle your bird a lot before the show.  Make sure it is fine with being turned upside down to show the keel, having its wings stretched out, and standing calmly on the table without flying off.  If your bird likes to fly, it’s usually OK if you keep a hand on its back.  After you’ve practiced with your bird, there’s a better chance of it behaving at the show.

Tip for if you get into the round robin: the trick to winning is to show the biggest, nastiest bird you can handle and win with.  Other people will bring their huge rabbits, wild geese, and grumpy guinea pigs.  Also, know as much as you can about other peoples’ animals.  Offer to teach them how to show your bird in exchange for learning about their animal.

BigThingsCoop

–BigThingsCoop


Chickens’ Favorite Treats

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Chickens are omnivores, and will eat almost anything—from dead mice to berries.  Our chickens’ favorite treat is pieces of cheese.  They also like grapes and scratch.  Chickens can have almost any table scrap, except chocolate or poultry.  Don’t feed your chickens raw eggs or they will develop a nasty egg-eating habit in which they crack open and eat their own eggs.  Once a chicken is an egg-eater, it is impossible to stop it.  However, cooked eggs have a different taste and can be beneficial to chickens’ diets.

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Chickens are omnivores.


Chickens also like rolled oats, various cereals, and spaghetti.  If you want to, you can buy mealworms or prepackaged chicken treats.  Chickens will also eat birdseed.  Bread is also a good chicken treat.  But don’t feed too much of it.  Don’t feed your birds bread if you have ducks.  Ducks get severely fat when they eat it.

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 Chickens will come running for treats.


Feed treats in little bits, and don’t make them as your chickens’ main diet.  Too many treats can make your chickens too fat or upset the nutrient balance in their diet.  But still, chickens really enjoy them.  A chicken will be your friend if your feed it treats.  Chickens like treats more than being petted.  Also, treats are good for teaching your chickens tricks.

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You CAN train your chicken!


Regardless of what people say, you can train your chicken.  A really easy trick to train them is to come when called.  Come up with a sound you will use to call them.  Then find somewhere where no chickens can see you.  After that, set an extremely tasty treat on the ground in front of you and make the sound.  Repeat several times over the course of a few days. But don’t call the chickens when you don’t have a treat for them too often, or they will stop coming.  This is a great tool for getting chickens out of the neighbors’ yard without anyone noticing.

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 Chickens LOVE treats.


–BigThingsCoop